Vocational Education and Training (VET) Lecturer

Summary

Vocational Education and Training (VET) lecturers teach vocational courses connected with specific industries and areas of work to help people enter or re-enter the workforce. VET lecturers teach subjects in which they have specialist knowledge, skills and experience, such as building and construction, business and commerce, commercial photography, hairdressing, horticulture, hospitality and tourism, retail, music, art, science, engineering and areas of health. Some VET lecturers teach in non-industry specific areas such as languages, literacy and general workplace preparation.

Duties & Tasks

VET lecturers may perform the following tasks:

  • research and write a syllabus which covers everything to be taught in a course
  • interpret training packages, prepare lessons and produce resources such as typed notes, diagrams, demonstrations and model patterns for use in teaching
  • teach students in classrooms or workshops, providing theory and practical training through lectures, discussions, practical demonstrations and supervision
  • assess students by setting and marking exams and assignments and evaluating completed projects
  • carry out administrative tasks, such as keeping student records, arranging timetables and ordering supplies of materials to be used in teaching
  • counsel and advise students with career or personal problems, or refer them to counsellors
  • attend meetings and serve on committees, or liaise with the community and industry.

Working Conditions

VET lecturers may teach courses during the day, at night and on weekends.

They need to constantly revise their own knowledge of their subject area and conduct industry and student surveys to ensure that course content and teaching methods are up to date.

Personal Requirements

  • enthusiasm for, and ability in, their chosen field
  • good organisational skills
  • able to communicate concepts and instructions clearly
  • enjoy working with young and older adults
  • patient when dealing with students of differing abilities and from different cultures
  • acceptance of the rights and needs of individual students.

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