How to become a Orthoptist

Orthoptists detect, diagnose and treat disorders of the eye and associated eye movement and vision problems.

Personal requirements of a Orthoptist

  • interested in people's health needs
  • enjoy health sciences
  • good communication skills.

Duties & Tasks of a Orthoptist

Orthoptists may perform the following tasks:

  • measure and assess vision and prescribe glasses when appropriate
  • investigate, monitor and assist with treating eye disorders such as glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic eye disease and age-related macular degeneration
  • measure and select intraocular (within the eye) lenses for cataract surgery
  • detect and manage eye movement disorders, such as strabismus (turned eye) and amblyopia (lazy eye), and their sensory consequences
  • conduct specialised diagnostic and imaging techniques, such as ultrasonography and topography, to determine the effects and progression of eye disease
  • assess and provide management strategies for people with neurological disorders
  • devise strategies for rehabilitating impaired vision and design therapy programmes to maximise an individual's remaining vision
  • provide reports on the existence of eye defects to practitioners, therapists and relevant authorities, such as transport authorities
  • provide educational information to patients, families and members of the community about eye conditions and their effects
  • assist the community by providing vision screening tests and promoting preventative eye health care.

Working conditions for a Orthoptist

Orthoptists often work with ophthalmologists, medical practitioners and other allied health professionals.

Avg. weekly wage:

$1,380

Future growth:

strong growth

Employment by state:

ACT 1.3%

NSW 43.2%

NT 0.2%

QLD 20.7%

SA 11.8%

TAS 4%

VIC 14.2%

WA 4.5%

Hours worked:

35.4

Unemployment:

below average

Gender split:

Proportion of male workers 50.9%

Proportion of female workers 49.2%

Education level:

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 10: 0%

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 12: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is secondary school: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Certificate 3 or 4: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Diploma or Advanced Diploma: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Bachelor degree: 29.3%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Postgraduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate: 70.7%

Age bracket:

Proprortion of workers aged below 35 years: 54.3%

Proportion of workers aged above 35 years: 45.8%

*The data above is sourced from the Department of Employment’s Job Outlook website.

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