How to become a Film and Television Camera Operator

Film and television camera operators set up, position and operate equipment in studios or on location to photograph or record people, events and scenes. Film camera operators use 16mm and 35mm film cameras or digital video for motion pictures, whereas television and video camera operators use cine-electronic television or digital video and video cameras for direct telecast and recording.

Personal requirements of a Film and Television Camera Operator

  • Able to accept direction
  • Highly organised
  • Attention to detail
  • Patient
  • Able to work under pressure
  • Good communication skills
  • Creativity
  • Able to work as part of a team

Education & Training for a Film and Television Camera Operator

To become a film and television camera operator you usually have to complete a VET qualification. Applicants may be required to attend an interview and/or submit a folio of work. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information. You can also become a film and television camera operator through a traineeship in Media. Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require Year 10. Alternatively, you can become a film and television camera operator by completing a degree in creative arts, media, screen production, or film and television. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your Senior Secondary Certificate of Education with English. Applicants may be required to attend an interview and/or submit a folio of work. Institutions have different prerequisites and some have flexible entry requirements. Contact the institutions you are interested in for more information. For further details, visit www.gooduniversitiesguide.com.au.

Avg. weekly wage:

$982

Future growth:

strong growth

Employment by state:

ACT 1.5%

NSW 32.2%

NT 0.3%

QLD 14.5%

SA 4.4%

TAS 0.2%

VIC 34.9%

WA 11.9%

Hours worked:

40.3

Unemployment:

average

Gender split:

Proportion of male workers 74.6%

Proportion of female workers 25.4%

Education level:

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 10: 0%

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 12: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is secondary school: 23.8%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Certificate 3 or 4: 7.9%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Diploma or Advanced Diploma: 43.7%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Bachelor degree: 24.6%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Postgraduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate: 0%

Age bracket:

Proprortion of workers aged below 35 years: 53.7%

Proportion of workers aged above 35 years: 47.3%

*The data above is sourced from the Department of Employment’s Job Outlook website.




Additional Information
A drivers licence is an advantage as camera operators are often required to drive to and from locations.
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