How to become a Criminologist

Criminologists examine the systems by which people accused of crimes are brought to justice, attempt to explain the reasons for criminal behaviour and suggest ways crime might be reduced. Criminologists may specialise in crime prevention, cybercrime, juvenile justice, policing strategies, economic crimes or corrections. They may work in the legal field, ensuring laws keep up with changes in society. They may also work in the social/psychological fields, studying the effects of the criminal justice system or the factors that contribute to offending behaviour by individuals.

Personal requirements of a Criminologist

  • Ability to think analytically and critically
  • Personal integrity
  • Interested in welfare and human behaviour
  • Interested in working with disadvantaged groups

Education & Training for a Criminologist

To become a criminologist you usually have to complete a degree in criminology, criminal justice, justice studies, legal studies or psychology. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your Senior Secondary Certificate of Education with English. A number of institutions in Australia offer degrees in these areas. Institutions have different prerequisites and some have flexible entry requirements or offer external study. Contact the institutions you are interested in for more information. For further details, visit www.gooduniversitiesguide.com.au.

Avg. weekly wage:

$702

Future growth:

moderate growth

Employment by state:

ACT 1.8%

NSW 24%

NT 4%

QLD 19.6%

SA 4.6%

TAS 2%

VIC 38.5%

WA 5.4%

Hours worked:

35.4

Unemployment:

average

Gender split:

Proportion of male workers 36%

Proportion of female workers 64%

Education level:

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 10: 0%

Proportion of workers who have not completed Year 12: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is secondary school: 23.3%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Certificate 3 or 4: 0%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Diploma or Advanced Diploma: 17.8%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Bachelor degree: 42.5%

Proportion of workers whose highest qualification is a Postgraduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate: 16.4%

Age bracket:

Proprortion of workers aged below 35 years: 38%

Proportion of workers aged above 35 years: 58%

*The data above is sourced from the Department of Employment’s Job Outlook website.




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