RMIT University

Bachelor of Arts (Photography) (Honours)

RMIT University

Type of institution: University/Higher Education Institution
Level: Undergraduate
CRICOS: 00122A

In today’s visually sophisticated but increasingly competitive and fragmented market, it is imperative for successful photographers to demonstrate a distinctive visual voice. This honours degree will provide you with the advanced knowledge and skills to effectively adapt to various ways of thinking and making photographic images. You will be guided through personalised mentorship and individual supervision, as you are introduced to practice-led research and research methodologies. Through intensive studio-based research and workshop practice, you will develop creative autonomy and a critical and ethical understanding of photography that will allow you to make significant cultural contributions. The Bachelor of Arts (Photography) (Honours) is designed for students who have successfully completed a three-year degree in photography, and who wish to undertake a further year of study to focus exclusively on an individual project. The degree will also appeal to commercial photographers, photographers with commissioned practices (such as advertising, editorial or fashion photographers), photojournalists, socially engaged practitioners, artists, designers and other creative industry professionals seeking a more advanced studio practice in photography.

Structure

96 credit points

Standard entry requirements

You must have successfully completed an Australian bachelor degree (or equivalent overseas qualification) in a relevant photographic discipline with a minimum GPA of 2.0 (out of 4.0).

Study information

CampusFeesEntryMid year intakeAttendance
Melbourne City Domestic: $32,640
International: $38,400
No
  • Full-time : 1 year

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